Posts tagged "haes"
  1. 3592
    13
    Mar

    "When obese people are at the size genetically normal for them, their energy balance and requirements per unit of lean body mass are indistinguishable from you or me or any other ‘normal’ weight individual, said Dr. Rudolph L. Leibel, M.D., now at Columbia University, whose laboratory at Rockefeller University, New York, has conducted some of the most detailed, complex metabolic research on energy balance and the biochemistry of fat. “An obese person is metabolically just like a lean person, except they’re bigger,” he said."

    -

    Sandy Szwarc -How We’ve Come to Believe Overeating Causes Obesity (via hityoutwo)

    Another one in honor of the asshole who believes that all fat people eat too much and lie about it.

    (via atheologist)

    (Source: junkfoodscience.blogspot.com, via dressesandyarn)

  2. 363
    31
    Aug

    Sometimes your body changes, and it sucks

    ilikeprettyclothes:

    riotsnotdiets:

    Historically, Fat Acceptance has framed body positivity in fairly stringent and problematic ways. I think a lot of work has been done to address these issues, but oftentimes these things get played out over and over again as new people come to the fold. 

    When you first discover body acceptance, after years and years of hating yourself and fucked up weight loss attempts and (for many) disordered eating, it can be so tempting to latch onto this mantra of “LOVE YOURSELF NO MATTER WHAT, THERE IS NO ROOM FOR COMPROMISE”. This results in a lot of fat activists advising others to simply “accept yourself”, and anything else is automatically Bad Activism. 

    Of course, not understanding the nuanced ways we experience ourselves/bodies and embracing this approach to self-acceptance often means trying (usually unsuccessfully) to sweep one’s more ambivalent feelings under the rug. It also means not being open to others’ discomfort with their own bodies in ways that can be racist, ableist, and cissexist. 

    In The ‘Fat’ Female Body, Sam Murray writes about one of the more insidious aspects of this kind of humanist logic: it reasserts a problematic dichotomy between mind and body. It says that we must, in our minds, overcome our bodies (and hatred of them). This is problematic for a couple of reasons: 1) this is the same strategy we are supposed to use, according to contemporary fat-hating society, to lose weight and become “normal” people, and 2) our bodies and minds are not ACTUALLY split—we perceive and understand the world THROUGH our bodies, and to imply that we can just “change our minds” about how it feels to be fat in a fat-hating world—in a world not made for our bodies—disregards this pretty important reality.

    Long story short: it’s really crucial that we make room for bodily ambivalence in our activism. 

    All of this is to say that my own body has changed a bit in the last several months. After a couple years of staying at a steady weight without dieting, I have found myself facing an unexpected shift that has added nearly 30 lbs. to my person. I wouldn’t have known it was 30 lbs. (although I did know I had gained weight—I looked and felt different, and didn’t fit in my clothes the same way), except for the fact that my friend had a scale at her house, and I snuck a peek after weeks of wondering how much, exactly, I had gained. 

    Prior to knowing the exact number, I didn’t feel BAD about my body. I didn’t like some of the small mobility changes I was noticing (back pain happening after only walking a mile, not being as limber or flexible, pain after any extended period of time in one position, etc.) and I definitely didn’t like my clothes not fitting, but I still loved my body, the feel of it and the look of it. I didn’t blame my mobility and pain stuff on the weight gain, per se, but on a lack of physical activity in general. 

    Now that I know for sure that I’ve gained 30 lbs., I still don’t feel bad about my body, but I had a moment (or two or three) of feeling like a really bad fat activist. And knowing that exact number triggered a lot of shame in me: shame that I couldn’t help wanting to know the number, shame that I had picked an arbitrary number that I didn’t want to be “over” and when I wasn’t I felt relieved, shame that the act of weighing myself triggered diet-y, weight loss-y feelings in me, shame that I felt shame

    I’m gonna be real honest with y’all right now: gaining a lot of weight really quickly kinda sucks, similarly to how losing a lot of weight really quickly, or any other swift changes in our bodies, can throw us for a loop.

    And I’m struggling with What To Do about it. In the distant past when I have gained weight my response has been to crash diet. I’m obviously not going to do that; I’m not going to engage in anything that could be called a “lifestyle change” or that involves me eating less of the things I love. I might try to practice some more intuitive eating—eating that requires that I check in with my body instead of just feeding it the easiest/cheapest things. I will be moving my body more, in an effort to stave off the pain I’ve been feeling lately as a result of my inactivity. And I’ll be working on continuing to love my body, to feel good as a body, to treat me with kindness and respect. I’m going to work on the shame I feel when I experience bodily ambivalence. I’m going to work on cultivating an activism that has room for all the ways I experience being fat in a fat-hating world. I’m going to work on understanding my self as a whole, not a split between a wispy being of thoughts and feelings and a separate, solid thing made of fat flesh and bones.

    And I’m maybe not gonna step on a scale again. That shit fucks with my head.

    This work is hard. But absolutely, certainly, 100% positively worth it. NOW GO LOVE YOURSELVES OR ELSE.

    Wow, this is really important and so relevant to things I’ve been feeling lately.

  3. 18806
    8
    Aug

    [Trigger Warning: Discussion of eating / food issues]

    fuckyeahsexeducation:

    re-cover-ed:

    Study finds fat acceptance blogs can improve health outcomes

    “Fat acceptance” blogs urging overweight people to shed negative feelings about their body image can lead to healthier diet and exercise choices, a study has found.

    The fat acceptance movement, which seeks to foster a support network among overweight people, has inspired a plethora of blogs and web forums such as CorpulentFat Heffalump and The Rotund — an online community that’s become known as the “fatosphere”.

    In a study published in the journal Qualitative Health Research, researchers from Monash University, the University of New England and the University of Canberra interviewed 44 fatosphere bloggers from Australia, the US and the UK about how their involvement in the movement had changed them.

    “There’s been a lot of criticism of the movement that it promotes obesity and encourages people to give up on weight loss and makes their health worse,” said one of the researchers, Dr Samantha Thomas, a Senior Research Fellow at Monash University’s Department of Marketing.

    “We saw there was a lot of opinion about the movement but very few people had actually studied it.”

    Interviews with the respondents revealed many had experienced feelings of worthlessness, shame, crash diets, cycles of starvation and binge eating and laxative abuse before discovering the fatosphere.

    “Having that support and feeling empowered, people slowly found that their health behaviours began to change dramatically. For example, many people suddenly felt confident to do swimming, something they would not have done before,” she said.

    “People shifted their focus away from weight loss and more toward health. A lot of people started to take part in physical activity not as a way to lose weight but because they enjoyed it. Instead of pounding it out on the treadmill they start playing with their kids. It’s actually a massive shift in the way they looked at things.”

    Shifting the focus away from restricting food and toward listening to the body’s needs could also lead to better food choices, said Dr Thomas.

    “There are actually a lot of lessons for public health here,” she said.

    “The term fat acceptance is really confronting for people. That’s why we have seen a lot of blame and criticism. Society tells us it’s not OK to be fat for a whole bunch of moral and medical reasons,” she said.

    “This study shows that far from promoting obesity and promoting negative health behaviours, the movement is really positive for some people’s health.”

    EAT THAT CONCERN TROLLS.

    (Source: theconversation.edu.au, via dressesandyarn)

  4. 111
    2
    Mar

    drst:

    Disney Accused of “Fat-shaming”

    robot-heart-politics:

    lasers8oclock:

    The world has gone mad.

    Firstly: BEING OVERWEIGHT IS NOT GOOD IN ANY WAY. PERIOD.

    There is nothing wrong with Disney encouraging overweight kids to lose weight because it would be empirically and undeniably good for them. I would much rather Disney do this than lie to kids and tell them that being grossly obese is all great and fine.

    No, being fat does not make you a bad person. But the state obesity is completely inferior to the state of being fit… you can’t argue this, it’s basic physiology and health.

    This “x-shaming” phenomenon brought on by ultra-sensitive, us-verse-them, society-is-out-to-get-me social radicals (see: feminists) is insane. What’s next, you can’t tell someone they should try to educate themselves because that’s “ignorance-shaming”? You can’t tell someone they should see a doctor because that’s “illness-shaming”? You can’t tell someone they shouldn’t murder people because that’s “homicide-shaming”?

    What happened to freedom of speech?
    Moreover, what happened to common sense?

    -Joe-

    PS - Once upon a time I used to be very unhealthy and overweight. I improved myself. I’m glad society told me having excess weight was bad because it gave me incentive to lose it.

    As usual, science often contradicts what people call “common sense.” (Perhaps, because if there’s anything we all have probably figured out by now about having good sense, it’s that it’s certainly not common.)

    Study: Edmonton Obesity Staging System: association with weight history and mortality risk

    “Our study challenges the idea that all obese individuals need to lose weight,” said Dr. Jennifer Kuk, professor in York University’s School of Kinesiology & Health Science in Toronto. One in five obese people may not have medical problems, the authors estimated.

    In [an] article published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, Canadian researchers found similar results. Although higher BMI was associated with increased death risk, there was “considerable variation in the health risk profile” in the obese population, according to the report.

    The study used data from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study, consisting of 29,533 individuals, and assessed their mortality 16 years later. They found no difference in death risks between normal-weight individuals and obese individuals who were in stages zero or one of the Edmonton Obesity Staging System.

    They “are at no greater risk of dying than normal weight individuals,” said Kuk. [source]

    Study: Body Mass Index and Survival in Men and Women Aged 70 to 75

    Two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis of selected articles on BMI and mortality spanning 1966 to 2004 have concluded that BMI in the overweight range is not a risk factor for all-cause mortality in older people

    Study: Survival advantages of obesity in dialysis patients

    High concentrations of total cholesterol have been associated with both a survival advantage in these patients, as has an inverse relation between blood pressure and outcome. These consistent findings across an array of cardiovascular risk factors in dialysis patients support the more inclusive term “reverse epidemiology.”

    Reverse epidemiology has also been observed in heart failure patients, elderly persons, and patients with advanced malignancies, AIDS, and other chronic diseases. This means that 20 million persons—including almost half a million dialysis patients—in the United States alone may be subject to this reverse epidemiology. We believe this vulnerability to reverse epidemiology could have very important implications for public advice on health matters, because conventional recommendations for the management of CVD risk factors, such as weight reduction or aggressive treatment of hypercholesterolemia, may not be appropriate.

    Study: Rethinking Obesity: An Alternative View of its Health Implications

    In an article he wrote with Paul Haskew in the Journal of Obesity and Weight Regulation in 1987, there is a long list of the health benefits of obesity. Turns out that the condition is associated with a lower incidence of cancer, cancer mortality, respiratory disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infectious diseases such as TB and UTI, bone disease such as osteoporosis and hip fractures, cardiovascular disease such as mitral valve prolapse and intermittent claudication, gynecological and obstetrical problems such as eclampsia, premature birth, hot flashes, and premature menopause. Overweight is also associated with a lower risk for anemia, type I diabetes, peptic ulcers, scoliosis, and suicide. [source]

    For funzies, what does a real, live expert have to say on the matter?

    It’s “absolutely” possible for people to be overweight or obese and healthy, said Dr. Pieter Cohen, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance. [source]

    In other words, you can’t judge someone’s health based on their weight or appearance, and you certainly can’t say that “being overweight isn’t good in any way possible.” At least not if you expect science to back you up. Not only can being overweight be associated with longer life, but it might actually even produce some positive health outcomes.

    Your weight != your health. The two can certainly be related, but it’s not a 1:1 relationship, which is why fat shaming people is actually, factually, and scientifically not useful, productive or about anything related to health. It’s about making people feel bad about themselves based on how they look using pseudo-scientific arguments to justify one’s personal disgust over other people’s appearance. The end.

    Reblogging again for robot’s awesome takedown. *fistbump*

    (via dressesandyarn)

  5. 104
    29
    Jan
  6. 356
    28
    Jan
    abowlofbranflakes:

newwavefeminism:

TW - fatphobia
What I find most hilarious about this campaign is that they’re justifying the fact that they’re taking pictures of sad looking children and super-imposing rude anti-fat statements on them with the mantra “stop sugarcoating” the issue of childhood obesity in Geogria
FIRST of all, who is actually sugarcoating anything? Have you been inside of a school? or anywhere in society? All we see everywhere we go is anti-fat sentiment. Subliminally in TV and posters everwhere, and literally through teasing and fat-shaming. But now we’re actually taking a bigger step at codifying and sending mass messages of literal fat-shaming because we don’t think overweight people “get it” enough.
but SECOND why this upsets me, and why all these type of ad campaigns bother me, is that these funds would be better spent actually providing low income communities with ACTUAL HEALTHIER OPTIONS. Ironically right before I ran across this shitty picture I was reading this short article: 3 reasons why the poor can’t eat healthy. We close the poor off of actual cheap and healthy food options and then send out hateful billboards when we notice obesity becoming a “problem”.
like, didn’t congress just classify pizza as a vegetable so some company that supplies schools food wont lose money? gtfo
This is what happens when people buy into the idea that people are just poor, in need & not healthy because of some pathological, cultural “we’s just ignant!” type of reason. No, if you want to actually make a difference start with acknowledging how we leave people without resources first before you talk down to people who are just trying to live life & survive…

I was a fat kid.  I am a fat adult. 
Fat kids know they’re  fat.  They don’t need a special campaign dedicated to making them  aware.  I guarantee that family members and school-mates have made them  aware.  More than likely not in the nicest ways.
Parents of fat  kids know they’re fat too.  They also don’t need a campaign dedicated to  awareness.  People have told them.  Pediatricians have told them.   Other family members have told them.  I bet the kids themselves have  told them because so many of their peers have made them feel less than  for it, and they’ve had to go to their parents for reassurance.
None  of these people need help being aware.  They all know.  My mom knew.   She simply didn’t know what to do about it.  I was a pretty active kid.   I played outside and rode my bike.  But I was still fat.  I have come  to the conclusion as an adult that I will probably always be fat.  I  have lost weight.  I have always gained it back though.  I focus on  eating balanced meals and exercising.  I am healthy.  I have no health  problems that are often related to being “overweight.”  None.  Pretty  good compared to some of my normal weight relatives who do have high  blood pressure and diabetes, and all the things people think I should  have.
This campaign is a waste of time and money.
It should  focus more on activity levels and balanced diet instead of fat shaming,  because I guarantee, these kids and their parents get that everyday  already.

    abowlofbranflakes:

    newwavefeminism:

    TW - fatphobia

    What I find most hilarious about this campaign is that they’re justifying the fact that they’re taking pictures of sad looking children and super-imposing rude anti-fat statements on them with the mantra “stop sugarcoating” the issue of childhood obesity in Geogria

    FIRST of all, who is actually sugarcoating anything? Have you been inside of a school? or anywhere in society? All we see everywhere we go is anti-fat sentiment. Subliminally in TV and posters everwhere, and literally through teasing and fat-shaming. But now we’re actually taking a bigger step at codifying and sending mass messages of literal fat-shaming because we don’t think overweight people “get it” enough.

    but SECOND why this upsets me, and why all these type of ad campaigns bother me, is that these funds would be better spent actually providing low income communities with ACTUAL HEALTHIER OPTIONS. Ironically right before I ran across this shitty picture I was reading this short article: 3 reasons why the poor can’t eat healthy. We close the poor off of actual cheap and healthy food options and then send out hateful billboards when we notice obesity becoming a “problem”.

    like, didn’t congress just classify pizza as a vegetable so some company that supplies schools food wont lose money? gtfo

    This is what happens when people buy into the idea that people are just poor, in need & not healthy because of some pathological, cultural “we’s just ignant!” type of reason. No, if you want to actually make a difference start with acknowledging how we leave people without resources first before you talk down to people who are just trying to live life & survive…

    I was a fat kid.  I am a fat adult. 

    Fat kids know they’re fat.  They don’t need a special campaign dedicated to making them aware.  I guarantee that family members and school-mates have made them aware.  More than likely not in the nicest ways.

    Parents of fat kids know they’re fat too.  They also don’t need a campaign dedicated to awareness.  People have told them.  Pediatricians have told them.  Other family members have told them.  I bet the kids themselves have told them because so many of their peers have made them feel less than for it, and they’ve had to go to their parents for reassurance.

    None of these people need help being aware.  They all know.  My mom knew.  She simply didn’t know what to do about it.  I was a pretty active kid.  I played outside and rode my bike.  But I was still fat.  I have come to the conclusion as an adult that I will probably always be fat.  I have lost weight.  I have always gained it back though.  I focus on eating balanced meals and exercising.  I am healthy.  I have no health problems that are often related to being “overweight.”  None.  Pretty good compared to some of my normal weight relatives who do have high blood pressure and diabetes, and all the things people think I should have.

    This campaign is a waste of time and money.

    It should focus more on activity levels and balanced diet instead of fat shaming, because I guarantee, these kids and their parents get that everyday already.

  7. 1310
    27
    Dec

    fuckyeahselfcare:

    kimosabe:

    WE SHOULD REMEMBER THIS MORE OFTEN:

    approachingsignificance:

    1. That it’s important to take good care of your body. 
    2. That our body does a lot for us, even though we’ve bashed it over and over and over. 
    3. That exercise is meant to be enjoyed, so you only practice the physical activities that are fun and truly make you feel good. 
    4. That you’ll still have days where you probably hate your body and your life. And that’s OK. 
    5. That your negative thoughts are not actions. So just because you feel bad about your body and want to restrict your food or over-exercise or miss that get-together doesn’t mean you will. It’s just a thought. You can choose to act on it or not. 
    6. That a positive body image means more than liking your thighs, butt and belly. That it encompasses not just taking good care of yourself but also honoring your body, respecting your boundaries and seeing doctors for regular appointments and when you’re sick. 
    7. That sleep does a mind and body good! 
    8. That you always have time to take care of yourself. 
    9. That you’re more than a few body parts. You’re an entire, amazing package. 
    10. That you’re worthy and deserving of respect at any size, shape or weight. 
    11. That weight loss isn’t a magical elixir for everything that’s wrong with your life. 
    12. That ads and magazines are preposterously Photoshopped so that the actual actresses and models don’t even look like that. That’s why they have to “train” so hard for their fashion shows. (And by train hard, I mean engage in super unhealthy habits.) 
    13. That eating is flexible and enjoyable. 
    14. That you can wear whatever the heck you like, not just supposedly slimming black clothes or bulky cardigans and sweatshirts. 
    15. That you don’t have to wait to lose weight to pursue your dreams. You can. do. it. right. now. (And I hope you will.) 
    16. That people who make mean remarks about your body are jerks, and their comments are more about them than you. 
    17. That just because everyone around you is dieting doesn’t mean it’s the healthiest thing to do. (If everyone was jumping off a cliff…just kidding.) 
    18. That your feelings are not scary or to be avoided at all costs. Instead, they provide you with valuable information about your needs and the actions you might want to take. 
    19. That having a positive body image is a process. Day by day. It might seem oh-so impossible at first but if you start small, it’ll improve. 
    20. That you deserve to love your body at any size, shape or weight!

    By Margarita Tartakovsky, MS

    I will print this out and carry it with me!

    (via dressesandyarn)

  8. 236182
    21
    Nov
  9. 514
    7
    Nov
  10. 1747
    7
    Nov

    sleepydumpling:

    red3blog:

    Another troll round-up to deconstruct the trolling of Maggie. I don’t normally engage with trolls (and do note that I’m not here, either, just commenting on them), but revisiting Fat Hate Bingo has reminded me of just how repetitive anti-fat trolling gets. The thing is, its not just fat positivity online that gets trolled. All fat people get trolled in our real lives. Some with a frightening regularity. I talk about the trolling not to engage with the hate, because that would be a fruitless endeavor. This isn’t talking with trolls, its talking about them and the messages they rely upon to try to enforce thin privilege and fat shame. I think its important that we recognize these tactics for what they are. An effort to put us in our place. Our place is not for them to define.

    sateria:

    i’m sorry but i completely DISAGREE with this. being fat is nothing about being perceived as not attractive, it is simply UNHEALTHY and leads to disease. 

    shoot, i’m twenty pounds over weight, get hit on daily, and look better than most skinny girls out there but i don’t think i should accept my body out of laziness to change or the confidence i already have.

    those extra twenty, thirty, fifty pounds can easily lead to hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, etc.

    THAT is not something to be proud of!

    truthof42:

    “Maggie dies of heart disease at the age of 52”

    I’m sorry, but Maggie is beyond an unhealthy weight. You can be chubby and still be healthy, but Maggie is probably having difficulty walking up stairs. Maggie needs to do exercise and eat healthy food. This is not about being fat, this is about Maggie not being healthy. There’s nothing wrong with being fat if you are healthy, but never have I ever seen a person who is healthy that is that obese.

    cunt-candle

    okay what the fuck, why are people trying to encourage children to become fat on purpose. sorry but this is not cool


    You notice something in common with these three posts? They all contain “Sorry, but…” Honestly, I missed that at first, but its actually important. Not just because it adds to “Sorry, but’s” unbroken streak of being uttered by people who don’t mean it. Its why people say it. You say “I’m sorry, but” as a preface to an unpopular opinion. That’s how the phrase is meant to be used (though, still without meaning it). What’s so unpopular about shaming fat people? Well, because most people don’t like to think of themselves as the enforcers of the status quo, so they fantasize that is actually them who are speaking truth to power. This self-flattery of their perceived righteousness really informs much of what they have to say.

    Which, again, is nothing fat people haven’t heard before. Fat people are just looking for an excuse to not lose weight? Heard it. Fat people are going to DIE!!!!!?! Heard it. We’re ordering children to gain weight? Sadly, heard that, too.

    Step back and really look at the Maggie sequels. Far from the claims of forced child fattening, there REALLY isn’t anything exceptionally radical here, is there? Even at her most political, Maggie is still focusing on affirmation more than anything else. Maggie buys clothes? Maggie dances? Maggie wears a necklace? Its down right banal, so why the outlandish accusations?

    Because in a fat body, the banal can still be political. Just living your life IS enough to be called lazy. Just living your life is enough to be targeted for death threats of the “you will die if you don’t agree with me” variety. Just living your life is like the same thing as force-fattening babies. Going to the beach, monitoring our health as we choose, just living.  Forget doing awesome stuff. There is a legion of self-appointed haters to pounce on us when we do anything. Because they aren’t really self-appointed at all. All of these things are politicized because we live in a culture which empowers people to shame and stigmatize us for everything we can possibly do.

    If you look at this project and find inspiration for all the awesome things you want to do, that is incredible and fantastic. Go for it. Its okay to seek out inspiration for just living your lives, too, though. Its okay to want support just for doing anything because there people out there who will see to it that we need it. No matter what, none of us go through this alone. No matter how isolated they want us to feel, we share those feelings and can find support and community in others who have gone through the exact same things. They want to define us, and in a way they do. They define us by our shared struggles and by our shared triumphs, both dramatic and mundane.

    Reblogging for Brian’s excellent Troll Beatdown

    (via abowlofbranflakes)

  11. 1284
    10
    Sep

    "

    Can fat people be healthy? A provocative new study shows that obese people who are otherwise healthy live just as long as their slim counterparts.

    And that wasn’t the only surprising finding. The study also showed otherwise healthy obese people are even less likely than lean people to die of cardiovascular disease.

    Our findings challenge the idea that all obese individuals need to lose weight,” study author Dr. Jennifer L. Kuk, assistant professor at York University School of Kinesiology & Health Science, said in a written statement. “Moreover, it’s possible that trying - and failing - to lose weight may be more detrimental than simply staying at an elevated body weight and engaging in a healthy lifestyle that includes physical activity and a balanced diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables.”

    "

avatar_96
I knit. And do other things. And then photograph them.


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